Hollywood Yenta Roundup: Seth Rogen, Ben Savage, and Amanda Bynes…

by JDateAdministrator under Entertainment,News

1. Seth Rogen Scores at the Box Office

This is not the end for This Is the End.

Since opening last week, the film has earned $33 million at the box office, making it one of the biggest hit comedies of the year.

Written and directed by Jewish entertainers Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, the apocalyptic comedy stars Rogen and quite a few of his famous friends, including James Franco, Jonah Hill and Craig Robinson. The A-listers all play “themselves” and fight to survive after the apocalypse strikes while they’re at a Hollywood party. While that shindig may have been over, Rogen’s run at the box office is definitely not!

 

2. Ben Savage Gets the Green Light

Girl Meets World is officially a go! The spin-off of the popular ‘90s series, Boy Meets World, was picked up by the Disney Channel this week.

The original series followed Cory Matthews (played by Ben Savage, who is Jewish) through the trials and tribulations of growing up, but this new series will reunite Savage with his on-screen sweetheart, Danielle Fishel, as the parents of a tween daughter – hence the “Girl” Meets World title.

Twenty-somethings everywhere have been buzzing about the ’90s sitcom reboot since news of the pilot broke late last year. Looks like there is now reason to keep buzzing!

 

3. Amanda Bynes Makes a Rare Apology

Pay attention because this doesn’t happen often! In a rare move, Amanda Bynes apologized to Drake (her former celebrity crush) for calling him “ugly” on Twitter.

The Jewish actress Tweeted, “I’m sorry about the Tweets I said about Drake. I didn’t mean what I said. I hope to become friends with him instead of smashing him!”

So, with this apology in mind, is the 27-year-old turning a corner? Perhaps not. She Tweeted yesterday, “I don’t like leading people on. I will not date @drake ever. I only want to be his friend. I’m sorry that I insult him but it’s hard not to!” Something tells us Drake is now waiting for her phone call…


Hollywood Yenta Roundup: Rep. Susan Davis, Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath and Dear Abby

by JDateAdministrator under Entertainment,Judaism,News

1. DC Jews Celebrate Inauguration Weekend

Monday’s 57th Presidential Inauguration officially sent Barack Obama into a second term as America’s 44th President, and members of the Washington D.C. Jewish community were right there with him to participate in inauguration-weekend activism and service events.

The Women’s Leadership Network luncheon of the National Jewish Democratic Council kicked off the inaugural weekend in “Jewish Washington” last Friday. The group held a discussion panel which included former White House Communications Director Ann Lewis, Rep. Susan Davis (D-CA) and The Jerusalem Post Washington Bureau Chief Hilary Krieger.

It was “one of the most inspirational events I’ve attended in a very long time,” Barbara Goldberg Goldman told JNS.org.  “Proud Jewish women of all ages came together to share their desire to perform tikun olam and make a difference in the world in which they live.”

 

2. Rabbis Who Marched with MLK

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day yesterday, JSpace.com is showing how a Torah made its way to Dr. King’s March on Selma.

In 1965, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote to Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath, sharing an idea he had for a march with the Jewish leader. King was planning an unprecedented demonstration, hoping to bring thousands on a walk from Montgomery to Selma in support of voting rights for the black community.

What resulted would go down in history as one of the greatest civil rights moments of all time. Rabbi Eisendrath did indeed participate, as did other spiritual leaders from many other factions. Click here to see an iconic photo from the Selma march, in which Rabbi Eisendrath, clutching a Torah, can be seen standing with Dr. King.

 

3. Dear Abby Dies at 94

Pauline Friedman Phillips, known around the world a “Dear Abby” died Wednesday after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease. She was 94.

Phillips was born in Iowa in 1918 to Russian-Jewish immigrant parents. In 1937, she began writing the iconic “Dear Abby” advice column, assuming the penname Abigail van Buren. The column would go on to earn worldwide fame as a syndicated piece of Americana, printed in more than 1,000 newspapers.

Phillips was a member of Women in Communications, the American College of Psychiatrics, and the National Council of Jewish Women.