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(Alleged) Jewish Conspiracies We Have Known (Alleged) Jewish Conspiracies We Have Known

World domination, war-mongering and brainwashing through psychoanalysis; it’s all in a day’s work for Jews, who have long been the subjects of conspiracy theories and vicious rumors. Here are eight of the most persistent and pernicious.

They Called Him “Two-Gun”
They Called Him “Two-Gun”

The nickname “Two-Gun” evokes images of a rough-shaven cowboy in the Wild West. Actually, the nickname belonged to one Morris “Moishe” Cohen.

How Now, Red Cow
How Now, Red Cow

Every year, on the Shabbat following Purim, a special reading from Numbers 19, is added to the regular Shabbat Torah reading. Known as Parashat Parah, the Torah reading concerns the special purification ceremony of the Parah Adumah (Red Heifer) one of the most intricate and mysterious laws found in the Torah.

An Eye On The Nations
An Eye On The Nations

The world has been hit by a series of devastating natural phenomena. Powerful earthquakes and raging floods have created monumental scenes of destruction. With great pride, many Jews point out that the Israeli emergency response and search and recover units are often among the first to arrive with assistance. It is interesting to see the connection of these actions of goodwill to all humankind in the Biblical story of Jonah.

A Renaissance Woman A Renaissance Woman

A brilliant business mind, a flare for statesmanship and a charismatic personality… today’s Jewish Treat focuses on a renowned Jewish Renaissance Woman: Dona Gracia Mendes (Dona Gracia Nasi).

Purim! Again?
Purim! Again?

Unique to the Jewish calendar, Purim is actually observed on different days depending on location.

The Sabbath of Remembering
The Sabbath of Remembering

This Shabbat is Shabbat Parashat Zachor, the Sabbath of Remembering.

The Four Mitzvot of Purim
The Four Mitzvot of Purim

Purim is celebrated on Sunday, March 20th (beginning after Shabbat on March 19th). Four mitzvot are associated with the holiday:

The Fast of Esther
The Fast of Esther

“Go, gather together all the Jews that are present in Shushan, and fast for me, and neither eat nor drink three days, night or day; I also and my maidens will fast in like manner; and so will I go into the king, which is not according to the law; and if I perish, I perish” (Esther 4:16). So responded Esther to her uncle Mordechai when he requested that she present herself, unbidden, before King Achashverosh.

It Was Bashert
It Was Bashert

Bashert, which in Yiddish means “predestined,” is most commonly applied to the concept of one’s intended soul-mate. This idea that, when dating, one is searching for his/her bashert, his/her divinely intended life partner, stems from Sotah 2a, which states: “Forty days before the creation of a child, a Heavenly Voice issues forth and proclaims: ‘The daughter of A is for B.’”

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