Home » JCentral

more

Happy Birthday to Moses
Happy Birthday to Moses

To write a biography of Moses in under 300 words would be impossible. From the moment he was born, his life was filled with incredible events. But today is the seventh of Adar, and the Talmud (Megilla 13b) teaches that Moses “died on the seventh of Adar and was born on the seventh of Adar.” Therefore, Jewish Treats shares with you a glimpse into the beginning of the life of the great Moses.

The Emperor’s Nephew
The Emperor’s Nephew

“A man should always complete the Torah portion together [at the same time] with the congregation, [reading] twice the Hebrew text and once the [Aramaic] Targum… [if he does so,] his days and years are prolonged” (Rabbi Huna ben Judah in the name of Rabbi Ammi, Berachot 8a).

My Chicken Doesn’t Moo
My Chicken Doesn’t Moo

Poultry has an interesting status in the world of Jewish law. It is the paradigm of rabbinic jurisdiction, underscoring the fact that the sages of the Talmud have the authority to transform halacha (Jewish law).

Reclaiming Your Inner JAP
Reclaiming Your Inner JAP

Jewish. American. Princess. Benign as these words may be apart, together they form an unpleasant image. The American Heritage Dictionary calls JAP “offensive slang” and defines it as, “a Jewish American girl or woman regarded as being pampered or overindulged.” Urban Dictionary, an online site with reader-created definitions, is less delicate: A JAP is a “large-breasted, outwardly attractive, internally spoiled, greedy, complicated, self-righteous and obnoxiously difficult and overbearing Jewish female.”

“No More Pharaohs and No More Slaves”
“No More Pharaohs and No More Slaves”

By the mid-1800s, Jews were settled throughout the United States, and many had absorbed the local culture in which they were living. Among the Jews of the south, there were, therefore, Jewish slave-holders. And in the north, there were many Jews involved in the abolitionist movement.

Challah Is Taken
Challah Is Taken

The Hebrew word “challah” does not actually mean bread, but rather refers to the tithe of the bread that was given as a gift to the priests in ancient times (Numbers 15:20). Exactly when the term challah began to be applied to the bread eaten on Shabbat is unclear.

Supply List
Supply List

What do gold, silver and copper; aqua, purple and red-dyed wool; linen, goat hair, animal skins, acacia wood, olive oil, spices and gems have in common? These were the primary items that the Israelites needed to gather and donate in order to build God a sanctuary in the wilderness.

A Ship’s Tale
A Ship’s Tale

Well sit right back and I’ll tell a tale…Alas, this ship’s tale is no three-hour tour, but the story of the birth of Jewish life in North America.

Don’t Shame The Name
Don’t Shame The Name

The concept of “Chilul Hashem,” desecration of God’s name, is first mentioned in the Torah in Leviticus (22:32), when the Jewish people are commanded: “You shall not shame My Holy Name; and I will be sanctified amongst the people of Israel, I am God.”

The Delectable History of Jews and Chocolate
The Delectable History of Jews and Chocolate

Kugel.  Brisket.  Gefilte fish.  These are the familiar foods that are thought to make up Jewish culinary history.  But one common and much-loved food has a longstanding but little-known connection to the Jewish community.  Behold—chocolate, the forgotten Jewish food.

Jmag Search
Search now! »
Please enter a zip code.

polls

  • What bad habit do you need to break?

    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...